The United States Navy,
January 1, 1892
Following the Civil War, the United States Navy rapidly demobilized, and for the next 15 years suffered through one of the worst periods in its history, with a shrinking,
technologically obsolete fleet. Starting in the early 1880's, the government and public gradually came to support the concept of rebuilding the nation's naval force. After considering
a series of proposals, Congress authorized a small start with the so-called ABCD ships, also known as the "Squadron of Evolution." These ships, cruisers ATLANTA, BOSTON,and
CHICAGO as well as dispatch vessel DOLPHIN were the first ships of the "Steel Navy." Over the next decade, the Navy slowly received approval to build more modern vessels, but
each took so long to build they proved to be obsolescent when commissioned.

By 1892, the Navy was in the midst of this rebuilding, but still lacked any combatant larger than a cruiser, with the "Coast Battleships" TEXAS and MAINE still under construction. Six
years later, the Navy would secure its future with victories at Manila and Santiago Bays, but in 1892 there was little evidence it could perform well in battle.  The fleet showed a mix
of Civil War-era ships (though most of the monitors remained decommissioned in reserve) and untested newer vessels. Ashore, the Navy lacked Pacific bases and its existing east
coast bases were more a source of political patronage for members of Congress than they were support elements for the fleet.

FORCES AFLOAT
  
MAJOR STATIONS
  OTHER VESSELS


SHORE ESTABLISHMENT
  
NAVY DEPARTMENT
  BASES
  SPECIAL DUTY

LIST OF CAPTAINS ON ACTIVE DUTY
LIST OF FLAG OFFICERS, ACTIVE AND RETIRED      

FLAG OFFICER ASSIGNMENTS 1890-1900




Home Page
The cruiser PHILADELPHIA, flagship of the North Atlantic Station, in
1892.

US Navy Photo from the Naval History and Heritage Command  
On-Line Library.
As far as I know, it is in the public domain.
USS VESUVIUS, an experimental vessel which, though not
successful, represented the forward moving Navy.

US Navy Photo from the Naval History and Heritage Command  
On-Line Library.
As far as I know, it is in the public domain.